Academics

Academic Programs

Structured for Success

Based on Quebec Ministry of Education guidelines, the Stanstead College curriculum is broadly divided into junior (Grade 7, 8) and senior levels (Grade 9, 10, 11), with the core subjects of Mathematics, English and French emphasized at each level. Grade 11 is highlighted by advanced level courses in Mathematics, French, Chemistry and Physics. Students may opt for French as a second language or Français as a first language (langue maternelle).

Students graduate from high school upon the successful completion of their Grade 11 (Secondary V) year. Students may choose to attend Quebec CEGEP (two-year college subsidized by the Quebec government) or enroll in Grade 12, which provides students with an intensive university preparatory program.

Because of the sequential nature of the Quebec curriculum, senior students are encouraged to enrol at Stanstead College in Grade 9 or 10 at the latest. Ideally, junior students should enrol in Grade 7.

Stanstead also offers an English Second Language program.
“The experiences I gained and the education I received at Stanstead College are incredibly valuable for my future. I feel well-prepared for university through the challenging curricula and university guidance program. And despite being an academically-oriented institution, Stanstead College provides opportunities for students to grow and develop in different aspects, such as leadership, athletics, music and arts. Above all, what makes this an amazing place is the community within. The positivity, inclusiveness and compassion of each member brought our small and diverse school together into one big family. I am lucky to have found a place where I belong and a place to call my second home, here at Stanstead College.”
– Van Pham, Class of 2019, is studying mathematics at McGill University

Courses by Grade

List of 7 items.

  • Grade 7

    Art
    An introductory course to develop artistic appreciation of the various approaches and techniques in visual arts. Students are encouraged to increase sensitivity, subjectivity and creativity in their work. They expand their unique visual vocabulary and competencies in the use of materials through a sequential series of lessons involving painting, drawing and basic block printing. Use of intuition, observation and imagination is encouraged throughout this course.
     
    English
    The English Language Arts course is first and foremost a literacy program that centres on the connection between the learner’s world and the social purposes served by language, discourse and texts. The program focuses on developing fluent readers and writers of spoken, written and media texts in order to become active, critical members of society and to foster an appreciation of their rich literary and cultural heritage.
    • Uses language/speech to communicate and learn
    • Reads and listens to written, spoken and media texts; represents literacy in different media
    • Writes in a variety of genres for personal and social purposes
    French
    Beginner:  Since French is a required subject, a beginning course is given to those students who have never studied French or who have the most elementary knowledge of French. The goal is to provide instruction in French to enable them to be integrated into the intermediate French Second Language course the following year.

    FSL Intermediate:  In this course, students learn to develop their speaking and listening abilities. They also improve their writing skills through grammar review. They are required to read a variety of short texts and to prepare oral presentations. Students are expected to speak French in class.

    FSL Advanced:  This course is required for students who have already advanced beyond the intermediate level. Students are expected to be much more competent in spoken French and must speak French in class, participate in discussions, present oral reports, develop dialogues and produce a variety of texts.

    Français: Addressed to students who speak French fluently, this course allows them to work extensively with various literary texts. Emphasis is put on reading comprehension exercises, and students regularly write texts as both group and individual projects. There is continued emphasis on written work and the study of grammar. Students are required to choose supplemental reading to develop their skills. 
     
    Geography
    This course is designed to introduce the basic techniques, tools and format of the social science program. Content elements include human vs. physical geography, the geographic features of Quebec as well as the study of life in Central and South America. Methodology includes learning through group exercises and projects, with an emphasis on the use of technology in the classroom. The aim of this course is to introduce students to investigative project-based learning.
     
    History
    This is the first of two History and Citizenship Education (HCE) courses in the first cycle of the Quebec Education Program. The HCE program has two educational objectives: to enable students to develop their understanding of the present by studying the past; and to prepare them to participate as informed citizens in our society. There are three subject-specific competencies that students are expected to develop within the HCE program: examine social phenomena from a historical perspective; interpret social phenomena using the historical method; and construct a consciousness of citizenship through the study of history. Specific course content includes: the basics of chronology, tools and the historical method; prehistory during the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods; early civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt; Ancient Greece and Rome; and the early Middle Ages.
     
    Mathematics
    A review of elementary school mathematics is followed by a thorough study of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percent. This is extended to include integers and rational numbers. Students learn how to collect, collate and study statistical infor-mation and study isometric transformations, straight lines, angles, properties of polygons, area and perimeter and probability. They are also introduced to the funda-mentals of algebraic concepts, such as monomials and polynomials.
     
    Music
    Beginner: This introductory music course is designed for the very beginner who has no previous music training. Students select an instrument and learn to play a few simple pieces by the end of the year. A music method book, which includes sample tunes from various cultures, is used to introduce the notes on the instruments. Theory and practice are mutually developed at a pace that allows students to grasp the basic elements of rhythm and melody. Students begin their musical literacy by being able to express themselves using basic musical terminology.

    Advanced: Students in their second year of music progress on their chosen instruments and attempt more challenging pieces. The fundamentals of rhythm and melody are reviewed and some basic harmony is introduced. Ear training is reinforced by theory and becomes more structured to reflect the organizational patterns inherent in tonal music. The students are encouraged to take more initiative with performance opportunities as their confidence grows.
     
    Physical Education
    This course, which is interconnected with the Quebec Education Plan’s Personal Development subject area, introduces students to topics related to healthy lifestyle choices, including cardiovascular health, introductory first aid (Red Cross), hygiene, the impact of alcohol and tobacco on the body and others. Topics from the sexuality curriculum are explored to help students better understand themselves and develop healthy relationships. The physical education portion of this course promotes comprehension, ability and commitment in each student that will in turn foster an enjoyment and appreciation for healthy living, wellness and a long-lasting active lifestyle. Students participate in a variety of activities with the goal of improving the wellness of the body, mind and spirit. Students learn and practice the skills and rules for team sports, such as ultimate Frisbee, flag rugby, futsal, touch football, capture the flag, cooperative games and more. There is a consistent focus on positive personal and social behaviours, with an emphasis on fair play.
     
    Science
    Students engage in problem-solving and laboratory investigations as they achieve the core competencies: seeking answers or solutions to scientific/technological problems, making the most of their knowledge of science and technology and communicating in the language of science and technology.  
    • Basic Scientific Concepts: Experimental Method & Lab Safety
    • The Earth and Space: General Characteristics of the Earth (hydrosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere) and astronomical phenomena (light, gravitation, solar system, the Earth, the moon, size and scope of the universe)
    • The Living World: The Diversity of Life Forms (species, habitat, adaptation, evolution), reproduction of living organisms (asexual and sexual reproduction, reproduction in plants, general reproduction in animals)
    • The Material World: Properties of Matter (characteristic & non-characteristic properties, states of matter, mass, volume, temperature, acids and bases, melting point, boiling point) and Transformation of Matter (physical changes, chemical changes)
  • Grade 8

    Art
    A progression to a more comprehensive program in developing visual awareness and communication through visual productions. Students explore a variety of mediums and methods as they learn to depict their perceptions of reality and work to resolve artistic problems. A more advanced understanding of the world around them is described in both two- and three-dimensional art. Use of lines, texture and forms help in the formulation of symbolic representation. During the course, students learn to improve and exercise their critical judgment in art.
     
    English
    The English Language Arts course is first and foremost a literacy program that centres on the connection between the learner’s world and the social purposes served by language, discourse and texts. The program focuses on developing fluent readers and writers of spoken, written and media texts in order to become active, critical members of society and to foster an appreciation of their rich literary and cultural heritage.
    • Uses language/speech to communicate and learn
    • Reads and listens to written, spoken and media texts; represents literacy in different media
    • Writes in a variety of genres for personal and social purposes
     
    French
    Beginner:  Since French is a required subject, a beginning course is given to those students who have never studied French or who have the most elementary knowledge of French. The goal is to provide instruction in French to enable them to be integrated into the intermediate French Second Language course the following year.

    FSL Intermediate:  In this course, students learn to develop their speaking and listening abilities. They also improve their writing skills through grammar review. They are required to read a variety of short texts and to prepare oral presentations. Students are expected to speak French in class.

    FSL Advanced:  This course is required for students who have already advanced beyond the intermediate level. Students are expected to be much more competent in spoken French and must speak French in class, participate in discussions, present oral reports, develop dialogues and produce a variety of texts.

    Français: Addressed to students who speak French fluently, this course allows them to work extensively with various literary texts. Emphasis is put on reading comprehension exercises, and students regularly write texts as both group and individual projects. There is continued emphasis on written work and the study of grammar. Students are required to choose supplemental reading to develop their skills.  
     
    Geography
    Students compare and contrast agriculture, forestry, tourism and energy in Canada and less economically developed countries. Featured topics are the development of the metropolis (New York, Montreal, Mumbai), commonalities of archipelagoes such as Japan and Tahiti and the challenges of life in the African Sahel. Students develop skills to analyze a topographic map, use contour to identify slope, identify various landforms (relief) and locate specific places through the use of the military grid coordinates.
     
    History
    This is the second of two History and Citizenship Education (HCE) courses in the first cycle of the Quebec Education Program. The HCE program objectives and competencies remain the same as those discussed in the Grade 7 section. There is an increased emphasis on meshing prior knowledge with the current subject-specific competencies to create an enhanced cross-curricular approach. Course methodology includes greater student construction of their own knowledge through document analysis, problem-solving, creative oral and written expression and critical thinking. Specific course content includes: the later Middle Ages; Renaissance; European expansion; age of revolutions; industrialization; the twentieth century; and an important world issue today.
     
    Math
    The Grade 8 Math course places a strong emphasis on proportional reasoning, which is applied in a variety of contexts including similar figures, percentages and the circle. Students spend a considerable amount of time studying the fundamentals of algebra as these skills are key to success in higher levels of mathematics. They then continue with graphing and solving linear equations. Geometric transformations are revisited, and the concepts of area are applied to three-dimensional solids.
     
    Music
    Beginner: This introductory music course is designed for the very beginner who has no previous music training. Students select an instrument and learn to play a few simple pieces by the end of the year. A music method book, which includes sample tunes from various cultures, is used to introduce the notes on the instruments. Theory and practice are mutually developed at a pace that allows students to grasp the basic elements of rhythm and melody. Students begin their musical literacy by being able to express themselves using basic musical terminology.
    Advanced: Students in their second year of music progress on their chosen instruments and attempt more challenging pieces. The fundamentals of rhythm and melody are reviewed and some basic harmony is introduced. Ear training is reinforced by theory and becomes more structured to reflect the organizational patterns inherent in tonal music. The students are encouraged to take more initiative with performance opportunities as their confidence grows.
     
    Physical Education
    This course, which is interconnected with the Quebec Education Plan’s Personal Development subject area, introduces students to topics related to healthy lifestyle choices, including cardiovascular health, introductory first aid (Red Cross), hygiene, the impact of alcohol and tobacco on the body and others. Topics from the sexuality curriculum are explored to help students better understand themselves and develop healthy relationships. The physical education portion of this course promotes comprehension, ability and commitment in each student that will in turn foster an enjoyment and appreciation for healthy living, wellness and a long-lasting active lifestyle. Students participate in a variety of activities with the goal of improving the wellness of the body, mind and spirit. Students learn and practice the skills and rules for team sports, such as ultimate Frisbee, flag rugby, futsal, touch football, capture the flag, cooperative games and more. There is a consistent focus on positive personal and social behaviours, with an emphasis on fair play.
     
    Science & Technology
    Students engage in problem-solving and laboratory investigations as they achieve the core competencies: seeking answers or solutions to scientific/technological problems, making the most of their knowledge of science and technology and communicating in the language of science and technology. The goal of this course is for students to understand the basic life forms, sexual reproduction and the importance of life-sustaining processes; to have a basic understanding of material properties, mixtures and solutions and the role they play in everyday life; to have an appreciation for the environment and the impact that human interactions plan in sustainability; and to understand how motion, simple machines and technical solutions impact the work we do.
  • Grade 9

    Art
    This is an intermediate course where students continue to build on artistic competencies as they extend their media literacy in areas such as painting, drawing and sculpture. Students have the opportunity to broaden their experience and consolidate fundamental skills needed to achieve desired creative effects. Contributions to the development of cultural and social values as well as personal meaning in their art are explored. Students adopt effective work methods and seek to achieve the fullest potential in their art.
     
    English
    A decisive course in which all language skills are sharpened and an emphasis is placed upon clear communication. Literature is approached in more depth; analysis is begun with the goal of personal response. Essays, building on previous skill study, show an increased awareness of coherence, clarity and unity. Punctuation, in an effort to demonstrate its value, is emphasized. Experience in dramatic production during class time is also afforded students working at this level.
     
    Ethics, Religion and Culture
    This is an MEES required course designed to inform students about different cultures and religions around the world. It does not take the position that one is better than another but exposes the students to the many religions, cultures and currents of thought found globally. The purpose is to educate students in order to increase their understanding of the world around them. The course also examines ethics through investigating ethical and moral situations both in history and occurring in our world today. The goal is to have students become engaged participants in our modern pluralistic society. The ERC program has been designed with three subject-specific competencies that students are expected to develop in this course:
    • to reflect on ethical questions
    • to demonstrate an understanding of the phenomenon of religion
    • to engage in dialogue
    A learning environment is provided that encourages the students to actively participate in class and to form their opinions and create their own autonomy. Dynamic interaction within the class is encouraged in the form of debates and discussions. Each student is encouraged to share their personal opinions on issues, while listening and learning from the thoughts of others. A wide variety of sources are  consulted to engage and enhance student learning.

    French
    Beginner:  Since French is a required subject, a beginning course is given to those students who have never studied French or who have the most elementary knowledge of French. The goal is to provide instruction in French to enable them to be integrated into the intermediate French Second Language course the following year.

    FSL Intermediate:  In this course, students learn to develop their speaking and listening abilities. They also improve their writing skills through grammar review. They are required to read a variety of short texts and to prepare oral presentations. Students are expected to speak French in class.

    FSL Advanced:  This course is required for students who have already advanced beyond the intermediate level. Students are expected to be much more competent in spoken French and must speak French in class, participate in discussions, present oral reports, develop dialogues and produce a variety of texts.

    Français: Addressed to students who speak French fluently, this course allows them to work extensively with various literary texts. Emphasis is put on reading comprehension exercises, and students regularly write texts as both group and individual projects. There is continued emphasis on written work and the study of grammar. Students are required to choose supplemental reading to develop their skills. 
     
    History
    This is the first of two History of Quebec and Canada (HQC) courses in the second cycle of the Quebec Education Program. The HQC program is organized as a chronological survey, with Grade 9 studying “Origins to 1840” and Grade 10 examining “1840 to today.” The general objectives of the HQC program focus on the characterization and interpretation of the distinguishing features of the historical path taken by Quebec society. The curriculum involves the study of the interaction between the diverse groups within the complex entity that form the nation. There are two subject-specific competencies that students are expected to develop in the HQC program: characterizes a period in the history of Quebec and Canada; and interprets a social phenomenon. Specific content begins with a primer on the geographical attributes of the region to enhance understanding of historical realities, such as settlement and economic development. There are four main chapters within the course: the experience of the Indigenous peoples and the colonization attempts from origins to 1608; the evolution of colonial society under French rule 1608-1760; the Conquest and the change of empire 1760-1791; and the demands and struggles of nationhood 1791-1840.
     
    Mathematics
    Students in Grade 9 continue to enhance their skills in algebra, particularly with regards to roots, radicals and the laws of exponents. From there, students study linear functions and linear systems, one-variable inequalities, properties of functions, probability, factoring and surface area and volume of composite figures. If time permits, students are introduced to other function families which they will study in Grade 10. Stanstead College offers an advanced level of mathematics in Grade 9. Students in this level will also study the basics of trigonometry, two-variable inequalities, permutations and combinations and quadratic functions.
     
    Music
    Beginner: This introductory music course is designed for the very beginner who has no previous music training. Students select an instrument and learn to play a few simple pieces by the end of the year. A music method book, which includes sample tunes from various cultures, is used to introduce the notes on the instruments. Theory and practice are mutually developed at a pace that allows students to grasp the basic elements of rhythm and melody. Students begin their musical literacy by being able to express themselves using basic musical terminology.

    Advanced: Students in their second or third year of study on their instrument are now learning jazz band repertoire as well as popular repertoire. They further develop their technique and playing skills as they work in large and small groups and learn to solo. Music theory and ear training include a study of more complex melodic and rhythmic patterns as well as scales and basic melodic structure in the major keys.
     
    Physical Education
    This course, which is interconnected with the Quebec Education Plan’s Personal Development subject area, introduces students to topics related to healthy lifestyle choices, including cardiovascular health, introductory first aid (Red Cross), hygiene, the impact of alcohol and tobacco on the body and others. Topics from the sexuality curriculum are explored to help students better understand themselves and develop healthy relationships. The physical education portion of this course promotes comprehension, ability and commitment in each student that will in turn foster an enjoyment and appreciation for healthy living, wellness and a long-lasting active lifestyle. Students participate in a variety of activities with the goal of improving the wellness of the body, mind and spirit. Students learn and practice the skills and rules for team sports, such as ultimate Frisbee, flag rugby, futsal, touch football, capture the flag, cooperative games and more. There is a consistent focus on positive personal and social behaviours, with an emphasis on fair play.
     
    Science & Technology
    Students engage in problem-solving and laboratory investigations as they achieve the core competencies: seeking answers or solutions to scientific/technological problems, making the most of their knowledge of science and technology and communicating in the language of science and technology. Grade 9 focuses on the Material World and the Living World. Both chemistry and physics principles are taught through the lens of the human organism. With the physical and psychological changes students are undergoing, students need to gain a better understanding of the human body and of the interdependence of its different systems. A study of the factors that affect the operation and efficiency of the respiratory, circulatory and nervous systems enables students to become more familiar with their own organism. Moreover, exploring the human body as a living organism provides an opportunity to integrate concepts. For example, students learn about compressible and incompressible fluids and apply these principles to the respiratory and circulatory system. The course structure is as follows:
    Unit 1 – Chemistry – Properties of Matter    
    Unit 2 – Physics – Force and Pressure
    Unit 3 – Physics – Energy
    Unit 4 – Physics – Waves
    Unit 5 – Biology – Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems
    Unit 6 – Biology – Nervous System and Sensory Organs
  • Grade 10

    Art/Drama/Music option
    Art
    A mature focus is developed at this level in terms of critical assessment and art as a tool for communication and creativity. Students acquire a stronger grasp of the manipulation of materials while learning to express their thoughts, values and feelings in a visual form. Exploring through study periods, students further develop their exposure to new concepts and mediums. Art history and theory bring their work into relevant context and strengthen their individual growth as art makers.
     
    Drama
    This course explores the main components of drama including performance, devising and directing. Students gain an understanding of how a text is brought to life on stage as well as how the drama form impacts their immediate surroundings. Lessons will focus on individual and ensemble work, performance as a means of expression and understanding drama as a social and cultural form.
     
    Music
    Students in their fourth and/or fifth year of study on their instrument work on more advanced jazz band repertoire and small and large ensemble pieces, further developing their technique and refining their performance skills. Students are expected to develop their personal performance skills to a level of confidence where they can improvise and solo comfortably within the group. Music theory includes a study of major and minor scales, intervals, triadic chord structure and harmonic progressions. Ear training includes both rhythmic and melodic dictation. Students submit their own original song compositions.
     
    English
    Advanced English 10/AP Seminar
    This pre-AP program respects Quebec Ministry of Education requirements, continuing to familiarize students with the writing process. It recognizes the need for AP English course preparation. Students experience extensive and in-depth reading and begin to develop the necessary critical analysis skills.
     
    AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. It is the first of two courses comprising the AP Capstone diploma. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies and foundational, literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team.
     
    English 10
    Students work with a variety of topics and modes in order to demonstrate an ability to write sustained coherent passages of narration, description and exposition. The literature part of the course consists of poetry, prose, drama and non-fiction with an emphasis on Canadian content. Students are expected to handle appropriate sight selections of poetry and the short story. Extensive reading in fiction and drama is required, and students are expected to respond in terms of the selections chosen for the structural aspects of those works. Strong emphasis is placed on responding personally to literature.
     
    Ethics, Religion and Culture
    Students begin the course by studying the theory of evolution followed by historical and chronological study of the rise and fall of the various civilizations of the Middle East that gave rise and power to the main religions of the area and how they spread throughout the world. The basic philosophy and backdrop to world religions will be studied as well as the top five religions of the world in detail: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. The course also looks at various artwork and cultural elements with religious significance. Then the course turns towards the modern-day justice system and law and investigates current events and ethical dilemmas and challenging, controversial topics. The course ends with a study of the future of humanity and what challenges the students will face in the future as adults.
     
    French/Francais
    Français 10
    Students analyze the elements of various literary texts and are expected to write various literary texts as individual projects. Students are introduced to the power of words by producing various literary texts. Considerable emphasis is placed on correcting errors in written French. Students are required to keep a file of their errors and corrections.

    FSL Enriched 10
    This level is considered a hybrid course between the advanced level and the mother tongue level. It is designed for strong second-language students who have exceeded the expectations of the advanced level or for mother tongue students who experience challenges with the writing and reading components especially. Once in Grade 11, students will write the Enriched Ministry exam.

    FSL Advanced 10
    This advanced course is required for students who have already advanced beyond the intermediate level. Students are expected to be much more competent in spoken French and must speak French in class, participate in discussions, present oral reports, develop dialogues and produce a variety of texts.

    FSL Intermediate 10
    In this course, students learn to develop their speaking and listening abilities. They also improve their writing skills through grammar review. They are required to read a variety of short texts and to prepare oral presentations. Students are expected to speak French in class.

    Beginner French 10
    This introductory course is designed for students who have never studied French or who have little knowledge of the language. Considerable emphasis is placed on learning the basic vocabulary of daily life and the structures of simple sentences. It is based on the four language components: oral communication, reading, writing and listening. At the end of the year students should be able to integrate into the intermediate level.
     
    History of Quebec and Canada
    This is the second of two History of Quebec and Canada (HQC) courses in the second cycle of the Quebec Education Program (QEP). The HQC program is organized as a chronological survey, with Grade 9 studying “Origins to 1840” and Grade 10 examining the period “1840 to Today.” The objectives and competencies of the HQC program remain the same as those discussed in the Grade 9 course. Specific content begins with two primers - one analyzing the geographical attributes of the region and the other a recap of some key content and concepts studied in Grade 9. There are four main chapters within the course:  formation of the Canadian federal system 1840-1896; nationalism and the autonomy of Canada 1896-1945; modernization of Quebec and the Quiet Revolution 1945-1980; societal choices in contemporary Quebec 1980 to the present day. Students must take and pass this required course to obtain a high school matriculation certificate in the Province of Quebec. There is a compulsory uniform final examination administered by the MEQ. The examination covers only the material covered during Grade 10 (Grade 9 HQC is not required to experience success with the Grade 10 course/final examination).
     
    Mathematics
    Science Option Math 10
    Pre-requisite: Math 9 (85%) or department approval. The Science Option has students continuing to develop their capacity for abstract thinking in order to enable them to make a variety of connections among the different branches of mathematics. This option prepares students for pure sciences and courses that contain science prerequisites. Students make formal use of symbols, rules and conventions and are required to construct proofs. Students will study algebraic expressions (identities, second-degree equations and one-variable inequalities), real functions (step, greatest integer, quadratic and their properties and parameters), systems of equations (including semi-linear), two-variable distributions (linear correlation and regression lines), equivalent figures, analytic geometry (midpoint, division point and distance between points), metric and trigonometric relations. There is a Ministry exam at the end of the course in June.
     
    Cultural, Social and Technical (CST) Math 10
    The Cultural, Social and Technical (CST) option helps students develop mathematical literacy so they can appreciate the connections between math and other aspects of culture. Students following this option are preparing for study in the arts, humanities and the social sciences. This option provides students with tools to help increase their capacity for analysis, consider different possibilities, make informed decisions, support their decisions and take a position on various issues. They study algebraic expressions (first-degree inequalities), relations and functions (periodic, quadratic, piecewise and step), systems of equations, subjective probability, statistics and one-variable distributions (measure of position), two-variable distributions (linear correlation), analytic geometry (slope, distance, division point) and basic trigonometry. There is a Ministry exam at the end of the course in June.
     
     
    Science
    Advanced Science and Technology 10
    This is an enriched path for students who are capable of covering the required material at a quicker pace and in greater depth and who plan to take Advanced Chemistry 11 and Advanced Physics 11. Advanced Science and Technology 10 is designed for students with an interest in pure and applied sciences. This course is broken down into two parts: Chemistry 10 and Physics 10. In addition to the chemistry section of the Science and Technology 10 core curriculum, Chemistry 10 reaches much deeper into supplementary content related to chemical principles. Content includes the periodic table and atomic structure, ionic and covalent compounds, nomenclature, chemical and physical properties, the mole, molarity, parts per million, electrolytes and conductivity, acids and bases, chemical reactions, heat, ecological interactions, biogeochemical cycles and environmental issues. In addition to the physics and technology section of the Science and Technology 10 core curriculum, Physics 10 provides students with enriched problems sets and requires critical thinking and rigourous mathematical treatment. Content includes magnetism, electricity, electromagnetism, electrostatics, fluids, forces, gravity, motion, momentum, potential and other forms of energy and work, material sciences and mechanical engineering.
     
    Science and Technology 10
    Science and Technology 10 is an introductory course outlining the basics of chemistry, ecology and physics. The program uses a constructivist methodology that emphasizes experimentation and properly written scientific reports. Students study elements, the periodic table, compounds, chemical reactions, solutions, concentrations, ecological interactions, biogeochemical cycles, environmental issues, energy, electrostatics, current electricity, magnets and mechanical engineering.
  • Grade 11

    English
    AP English Language
    AP English Language and Composition is an introductory college-level composition course. Students cultivate their understanding of writing and rhetorical arguments through reading, analyzing and writing texts as they explore topics like rhetorical situation, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization and style. Note: Depending on the year, this course will either be AP English Language and Composition or AP English Literature and Composition.
     
    Advanced English 11
    The main thrust of this course is threefold:
    • practicing communication skills in speaking and in poetic and transactional writing;
    • achieving personal response, in the student, to a wide range of literature in English including fiction, drama and poetry;
    • establishing a clear grasp of literary characteristics and components.
    In addition, the pre-AP English course employs texts and approaches that are geared to preparing students for the AP English Literature/Language Course in Grade 12.
     
    English 11
    Similar in content to English 10 but requiring the student to work at a deeper level in preparation for the Quebec Ministry of Education Language Arts exam.
     
    French/ Français
    Français 11
    In this course, students are required to read novels and plays. The novel is studied as a social and cultural phenomenon. Students read works assigned by the teacher and choose works from an approved list for personal reading and study. Oral and written exposés allow students to work on thematic material or character study. Articles are used to help students write informative texts and critiques. Students read and analyze editorial material to express their opinions as well as opposite points of view on various subjects. Emphasis is placed on writing compositions in order to improve writing skills. They also learn how to write a texte argumentatif. At the end of the year, students will write the mother tongue Ministry exam and the AP exam.
     
    AP French
    This class is offered to students who were in Français langue maternelle or to students who were in enriched French Second Language in Grade 10. Emphasis is placed on reading, understanding and analyzing francophone literature and translations of foreign literature. The objective is to involve students in their understanding of the world through novels. Different grammar aspects are explored. AP French can be an elective option in Grade 12. At the end of the year, students will write the AP exam and the enriched Ministry exam.
     
    FSL Advanced 11
    This course is designed for students who took Advanced French in Grade 10 or who display higher than average competency in spoken and written French. Considerable emphasis is placed on the development of the four language skills: speaking, reading, listening and writing. A thorough review of French grammar is undertaken, and students are expected to read and produce a variety of texts. Part of this course is used to prepare students for the regular Ministry exam at the end of the year.
     
    FSL Intermediate 11
    This is the final course in French, which leads to the Secondary V Certificate. Although students are grouped according to ability, the objectives remain the same at each level of the regular course in French Second Language. In this intermediate course students have the opportunity to improve their spoken French, develop reading and writing skills and undertake a thorough review of French grammar. Special emphasis is placed on communication and listening comprehension in order to meet the objectives of the course. At the end of the year, students have to write the regular Ministry exam.
     
    Beginner French 11
    This introductory course is designed for students who have never studied French or who have little knowledge of the language. Considerable emphasis is placed on learning the basic vocabulary of daily life and the structures of simple sentences. It is based on the four language components: oral communication, reading, writing and listening.
     
    Mathematics
    Pre-Calculus 11
    Pre-requisite: Math 10 (Science Option) 85% or departmental approval.  This advanced mathematics course is intended for students wishing to enter the AP Calculus course in Grade 12. The class covers all of the regular Grade 11 Science Option curriculum at an advanced pace. These topics include optimization, functions, conics, trigonometry and exponentials. From there, the course moves on to the basic concepts required for learning calculus, namely limits, summation notation, Riemann sums and determining slopes at points on a graph.
     
    Science Option Math 11
    Pre-requisite: Math 10 (Science Option) or departmental approval.  This is the advanced course at Grade 11. This course is designed for students who wish to study sciences, commerce, business administration or a technical trade and who have successfully completed Mathematics 10 (Science Option). It is required for many programs at the CEGEP and university level. The content includes: systems of inequalities, using functions to develop a mathematical model, absolute value function, quadratic function, square root function, rational function, piecewise function, exponential function, logarithmic function, sinusoidal function, inverses, trigonometric identities, conic sections, circle geometry and right triangles.
     
    Cultural, Social and Technical (CST) Math 11
    Recommended: Math CST 10. This is the regular course at the Grade 11 level. This level of mathematics is one of the minimum requirements for entry into all CEGEPs. Students will study linear functions, systems of linear inequalities and optimization, graph theory, correlation, probability, analytic geometry, geometric probability and logarithms. Should time permit, students will take an in-depth look at function families in preparation for the next level of mathematics.
     
    Science
    Biology
    This course is intended to help students understand the natural world, to demonstrate the dependence of biological development on the state of the society, to relate biology to contemporary problems and to understand the nature of scientific enquiry through practical work. Content includes cell biology, homeostasis, cell division, genetics, heredity, zoology, the animal kingdom and some aspects of human physiology.
     
    Advanced Chemistry 11
    This course investigates through experimentation and problem-solving the concepts required by the Ministry of Education at the Grade 11 level: gases, thermochemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, solubility equilibrium as well as acid-base equilibrium. Stoichiometry principles are integrated throughout the course. As the year progresses, students work on complex problems that require them to think critically and apply chemical principles from various units. By taking this course in Grade 11, students will be able to master ahead of schedule the fundamental concepts upon which much of AP Chemistry is based. The rest of the AP Chemistry course is completed the following year, enabling students to write the AP Chemistry examination by the end of Grade 12.
     
    Chemistry 11
    This program aims to foster students’ interest in chemistry using a constructivist approach, to enable students to adapt to the constant changes brought about by scientific progress and to prepare them for possible careers in science or technology. Students investigate the principles of chemical bonding, the behaviour of gases, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, dynamic equilibrium, applications of equilibrium and electrochemistry.
     
    Advanced Physics 11
    This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Physics curriculum offered in Grade 12. It covers in depth all topics of the MEES Grade 11 material at an accelerated pace. These topics include optics, vectors, kinematics and dynamics, and they are explored theoretically and by completing laboratory experiments. Upon the completion of the Ministry-required curriculum, the course moves on to more advanced topics, such as momentum and rotational forces.
     
    Physics 11
    This course investigates, through critical experimentation, two broad concepts: optics and mechanics. Specific topics include one-dimensional kinematics, projectile motion, reflection, plane mirrors, curved mirrors, refraction and lenses. Facility at mathematics is strongly recommended.
     
     
    Grade 11 Electives
    Art
    Prerequisite: Art 10. The course content is based on four respective disciplines through which the following aspects of the art experience may be studied and explored: art production, art history, art criticism and esthetics. Each area of study enables students to have a fuller knowledge of the richness of visual language as a means of representation for individual, cultural and social expression. The principles and elements of design are included in various forms throughout the program. A great emphasis is placed on individual instruction at this level. Students are encouraged to grow in competence as individual artists by acquiring the necessary building blocks for an enduring artistic awareness.
     
    Music
    Students in their fourth and/or fifth year of study on their instrument work on more advanced jazz band repertoire and small and large ensemble pieces, further developing their technique and refining their performance skills. Students are expected to develop their personal performance skills to a level of confidence where they can improvise and solo comfortably within the group. Music theory includes a study of major and minor scales, intervals, triadic chord structure and harmonic progressions. Ear training includes both rhythmic and melodic dictation. Students submit their own original song compositions.
     
    20th Century History
    A course studying contemporary world history since 1900. Topics include industrialism and contemporary society, main currents in contemporary thought, a study of alliances and interdependence, the Cold War and peaceful coexistence, decolonization and underdevelopment. The course allows for an in-depth study of the major economic, social and political trends throughout this period. Special emphasis is placed on the history of the United States.
     
    Economics
    Economics 11 exposes students to a broad cross-section of basic economic theory. This course provides students with the knowledge base to function as an informed consumer and producer operating within the global economic system. In this course students read and respond to a range of economic issues based upon real-time and real-world situations. They are given the opportunity to develop their oral expression skills through discussion, debating and presentations. The importance of developing abilities in this area is a key to successful communication as well as essential skills for success in college and the labour market of the 21st century.
     
    AP Seminar
    Students develop and practice skills in research, collaboration and communication that needed in any academic discipline. Students investigate topics in a variety of subject areas, write research-based essays and design and give presentations both individually and as part of a team.
  • Grade 12

    Find out more about Grade 12.

    English
    AP English Literature
    Students cultivate their understanding of literature through reading and analyzing texts as they explore concepts like character, setting, structure, perspective, figurative language and literary analysis in the context of literary works. Regardless of whether they take the AP exam, students receive a grade in English towards their Grade 12 Certificate. Note: Depending on the year, this course will either be AP English Language and Composition or AP English Literature and Composition.
     
    English 12
    The regular course for Grade 12 students who are working at their grade level or better. The course examines in some depth the four literary genres: the short story, the novel, drama, poetry. A thematic approach is employed and students are required to examine works from a variety of both contemporary and early writers, with an emphasis placed on independent study.
     
    Mathematics
    AP Calculus
    Prerequisite Science Option Math 11 (85%) or Pre-Calculus (80%). AP Calculus AB is a comprehensive survey of the basic concepts of calculus. The material covered is equivalent to a normal two-term college or university calculus class. The course requires the student to take the College Board assessment in May, which, if completed successfully, may lead to course credits in institutions of higher learning. Topics include graphical analysis, limits of functions, derivatives, slope fields, Riemann sums, definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and numerical techniques of integration.
     
    Calculus
    Pre-requisite: Math 11 Science Option (75%), Pre-Calculus, or departmental approval. This course is an introductory Calculus course, basic to all science-oriented students. Topics include: functions (including trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic) and their graphs, derivatives, applications of derivatives, qualitative analysis of curves, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, anti-derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals and their applications.
     
    Linear Algebra
    This course is intended primarily for students who plan to continue studying mathematics in university, be it engineering, commerce, business or pure science or math. Topics include matrices, Gauss-Jordan row reduction, determinants, vectors, lines and planes in 3-D, vector spaces, spanning, linear independence, bases, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, complex numbers, linear transformations and cryptography.
     
    AP Statistics
    Recommended: Math 11 Science Option or departmental approval. The purpose of the AP Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:  1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns; 2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study; 3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and 4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.
     
    Statistics
    There are no prerequisites for this course. Statistics 12 is primarily intended for students preparing to study the social sciences. It focuses on the accurate usage of descriptive statistics, probability analysis and the collection, analysis and presentation of statistical results. (This course is not available to students of AP Calculus.)
     
    Advanced Functions
    Pre-requisite: Math 11 CST.  This class is intended primarily for students who are not yet ready for Calculus but wish to study sciences or business in the future. There are four main topics of study: polynomial functions (types, graphs, properties, equations), rational functions (graphs, properties, equations), trigonometry (unit circle, graphs, properties, equations, trig equations, trig identities) and exponents & logarithms (laws, graphs, properties, equations, applications). Each topic of study is investigated thoroughly as preparation for university-level mathematics courses.  
     
     
    Science
    AP Biology
    This course is designed to help students appreciate the natural world, encouraging the use of primary sources with personal investigation. Topics include: chemistry of life, cytology, cellular energetics, cell communication, the cell cycle, heredity, gene expression, natural selection as well as ecology.
     
    AP Chemistry
    AP Chemistry expands on topics covered in Advanced Chemistry 11. Topics include quantum mechanics, atomic theory, VSEPR (valence shell electron pair repulsion) theory, redox reactions and electrochemistry, thermochemistry, application of calculus to chemical kinetics, solutions and acid-base equilibria. Problem solving techniques, completing laboratory procedures and writing laboratory reports are emphasized throughout the course.
     
    Chemistry 12
    A course incorporating both theoretical and experimental exploration of the concepts of general chemistry, extending and developing understanding of topics such as atomic theory, VSEPR (valence shell electron pair repulsion) theory, chemical kinetics, equilibria, redox reactions and electrochemistry as well as an introduction to organic chemistry. Chemistry 12 prepares students for first-year university chemistry.
     
    AP Physics
    This course covers the mechanics portion of a calculus-based physics course (Mechanics C). Topics include kinematics, projectile motion, Newton’s laws, equilibrium, momentum and impulse, conservation of momentum, centre of mass, uniform circular motion, rotational kinematics, moment of inertia, torque, rotational statics and dynamics, angular momentum and angular impulse, conservation of angular momentum, gyroscopic motion, work, linear and rotational kinetic energy, gravitational and elastic potential energy, conservation of energy, simple harmonic motion, oscillations, Newton’s law of gravity, circular and general orbits and the special theory of relativity. The course is structured to enable students to take the AP Physics C (Mechanics) exam, which is written in May.
     
    Physics 12
    This course covers the mechanics portion of a calculus-based physics course. Topics include kinematics, projectile motion, Newton’s laws, equilibrium, momentum and impulse, conservation of momentum, uniform circular motion, rotational kinematics, moment of inertia, torque, rotational statics and dynamics, angular momentum and angular impulse, conservation of angular momentum, gyroscopic motion, work, linear and rotational kinetic energy, gravitational and elastic potential energy  and conservation of energy.
     
    Grade 12 Electives
    AP Studio Art
    AP students at the studio level produce a portfolio of artworks acceptable as a document for further study in an artistic field and exhibition in and out of school. Students study in-depth the different elements of the AP requirements and are required to produce diverse, intensive and high-quality pieces of art falling under quality (the development of a sense of excellence in art), concentration (an in-depth commitment to a particular artistic concern), breadth (a variety of experiences in the formal, technical and expressive means available to the artist. A variety of methodologies in the course are employed, including studio work, introductory lectures, critiques, presentations, photography and digital media. Students are expected to successfully develop a personal visual language through meaningful and self-directed art.
     
    AP Comparative Politics
    This course is a traditional college level (half-course) introduction to the comparative study of state systems and their political components. The primary goal of the course is to increase student understanding of the history, political traditions, values and structures of comparative systems. The work involved concerns the study of political science theory and methodology and their application to the analysis of specific countries.
     
    AP French
    This class is offered to students who were in Français langue maternelle or to students who were in enriched French Second Language in Grade 10. Emphasis is placed on reading, understanding and analyzing francophone literature and translations of foreign literature. The objective is to involve students in their understanding of the world through novels. Different grammar aspects are explored. AP French can be an elective option in Grade 12. At the end of the year, students will write the AP exam and the enriched Ministry exam.
     
    AP Human Geography
    This introductory course focuses on the patterns and processes of human activities and their relationships with the Earth’s surface and our physical world. It analyzes the natural world and the implications that link people and places and the constantly changing face of environments and landscapes within which human life is situated. Students learn to utilize a variety of information sources and read and discuss knowledgeably in the field of geography. Students will be prepared to analyze and discuss a variety of geographic topics from the past to the present and future. Students also learn to conduct research and convey their viewpoints through major written assignments, oral presentations and debates.
     
    AP Macro-Economics
    This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Economics exam. Students learn how to graph and analyze critical economic concepts such as production possibility curves, supply, demand, equilibrium, market failures and different market structures. Students learn how to determine reasons for changes in market structures, AD/AS models, money markets, loanable funds markets and currency exchanges and their impact on society as a whole. Students formulate questions to explore issues, developments, concepts, models and policies related to overall expectations and to identify the focus of their inquiry. Students need to be able to determine which key concepts are relevant to their inquiry. Students develop criteria that they will use in evaluating data, evidence and/or information; in making judgements, decisions or predictions; in reaching conclusions; and/or in solving problems − to determine which economic model it would be appropriate to apply. Students collect relevant qualitative and quantitative data, evidence and/or information from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including community resources − determine if their sources are credible, accurate and reliable − identify the purpose and intent of each source − identify the points of view in the sources they have gathered. They will use a variety of methods to organize the data, evidence and/or information they have gathered, record the sources of the data, evidence and/or information they are using to support inquiry.
     
    Philosophy
    This is an introductory-level course offering an overview of the Western philosophic tradition and its main fields, namely: ontology (theory of being); epistemology (theory of knowledge); axiology (theory of value), including ethics (theory of right behaviour) and aesthetics (theory of beauty or art); and logic (theory of correct inference). Students learn critical-thinking skills and techniques used in researching and investigating topics in philosophy. Students learn the main ideas expressed by the major philosophers of the Western tradition, how to develop and explain their own philosophical ideas and how to apply those ideas to contemporary social issues and personal experiences. This course gives students many opportunities to analyze, explore, reflect upon and actively do philosophy.
     
    Psychology
    This course is a survey of the various disciplines in the field of psychology examined from the perspective of the different schools of thought proposed by the world’s most prominent psychologists, past and present. Content includes the history and methods of psychology, biology, states of consciousness, sensation and perception, learning, memory, human development and social psychology. Students carry out research, presentations and group discussions to study these core concepts.
  • ESL

    Select students who have little or no facility in English are offered a one-year intensive course in English within our English Second Language Program. Although students generally spend one school year in this program, some students may advance rapidly enough to be moved into some regular courses during the school year. Upon entry into the regular program, ESL students may be eligible to receive continued language support on a one-to-one basis.
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Courses by Department

Teacher Directory

Daily Schedule 2022-23 - Update August 30, 2022

What's In My Report Card?

List of 3 items.

  • Interim Reports

    These provide students and parents with updates between term reports. They include:
    • a comment for each course about what students have studied since the last report;
    • a comment about the individual student’s strengths and/or challenges in each course as well as suggestions for improvement;
    • an effort rating: S (satisfactory), U (unsatisfactory) or E (exemplary);
    • and a comment from the student’s advisor summarizing overall progress.
    Interim reports are issued and submitted to parents in October (effort and comment only) and December (effort, grade and comment). Interim reports in February and May are issued to students only, unless the student has a U or failing grade.
  • Term Reports

    These reports summarize student progress and include a grade for each term, issued in November, March and June. These reports include:
    • a comment for each course about what students have studied since the last report;
    • a comment about the individual student’s strengths and/or challenges in each course as well as suggestions for improvement;
    • a numerical mark and, where applicable, specific competency marks for each course;
    • the class average
    • an effort rating: S (satisfactory), U (unsatisfactory) or E (exemplary);
    • and a comment from the student’s advisor summarizing overall progress.
    All Term Reports are submitted to parents.
  • Letter Grades to Numerical Values

    A+ = 90-100       B+ = 77-79
    A = 85-89           B = 73-76
    A- = 80-84          B- = 70-72
     
    C+ = 67-69         D+ = 57-59
    C = 63-66           D = 53-56
    C- = 60-62          D- = 50-52
     
    F = Below 50
     

Quebec Ministry of Education requirements for high school graduation

All courses passed in Secondary IV and V, including compulsory and elective courses, are taken into consideration in awarding a Quebec Secondary School Diploma. The Quebec Ministry of Education awards a Secondary School Diploma to students who accumulate 54 credits from Secondary IV and V courses. Of these 54 credits, a minimum of 20 must be from Secondary V courses.

The following compulsory credits must be included in the above:

CREDITS                  
  • Language of Instruction – 6 credits – Grade 11
  • Second Language – 4 credits – Grade 11
  • Mathematics – 4 credits – Grade 10
  • Science & Technology – 4 credits – Grade 10
  • History & Citizenship Education – 4 credits – Grade 10
  • Arts Education – 2 credits – Grade 10
  • Physical Education & Health OR Ethics & Religious Culture – 2 credits – Grade 11
  • Ethics & Religious Culture  – 4 credits  – Grade 10
  • Contemporary World and Finance – 4 credits - Grade 11
The pass mark in all subjects is 60%.
 
For information on the Applied General Education Path & Work-Oriented Training Paths, please visit the Ministry website.

Notes: The above Ministry requirements represent the basic minimum standard for Quebec Secondary School graduation and do not meet the more rigorous standards required for CEGEP entrance. Students seeking direct entrance into a university outside the Province of Quebec would normally opt for the Grade 12 program following Secondary V.